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schools are poor people. that is the height of inequality. that is what i call it a civil rights issue. those people need choices. more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the school system. [applause] >> the secretary of state, as a member of the cabinet, [unintelligible] >> it has been a pleasure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] the ultimate compliment. >> he made the point that ideas matter. it also matter in national security. america realized it could not win the cold war if it still had a scandalous segregation in the south. winning the civil rights battle at home was a precondition of winning the fight politically across the globe. i think looking from the outside there is the same danger now. when i go to china and i criticize them for their lack of democracy, they say but we are educating all our people. you did not do that in britain and america. when i had been in the middle east, and talk to people on the edge of radicalism, they say look at the protest in justices in your british and european and american nations.
of inequality. that is why it is a civil rights issue. those people need choices, but it will have an effect on the individual child and more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say that as well. [applause] >> i would only add standards to that. i think it's important that we as a society, said very clear expectations for what it is. michael is a secretary of state, not in the sense that condoleezza rice was, but as a member of the cabinet there. the secretary of state and the united foundation for education. >> it has been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it is worth traveling across the united states. >> the ultimate compliment. >> the first time i have ever worried about you judging. [laughter] >> he made the point that national security, one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that they recognize it as a moral complex more than anything. and america realizes that they couldn't win these nations in particular. it was a precondition of winning across the globe. if you'll forgive me, but it's the same danger now. the e
of inequality. that's why it's called a civil rights issue. they need choices. it will have them an effect on the individual child more kids will be better educate and ting will have a effect on the -- so i would say -- [inaudible] [applause] >> i would only add standards. i think it's important as we as a society set expectations for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- not sense that cobbed lee -- condoleezza rice was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation
it violates civil rights. >>> sharp reaction to proposed closure of four fire stations in the east bay. voters turned didn't a measure last month that would have saved the stations. not far from the shell oil refinery. alan wang explains what this means. >> reporter: carol's home lies in the shadow of the shell refinery in martinez. the refinery has its own fire department in case of a major catastrophe it would receive aid from station 12 of the contra costa county district that could end due to lack of funding. >> i know, i'm not happy it is nice having the fire station across the street. >> going to impact response times to the areas around the station. >> reporter: if station 12 is shutdown, people living near the shell refinery would rely on a fire station in downtown martinez, it would add four minutes to response time. 12 with three ours could have been saved by a parcel tax measure that failed last month. supervisors were grappling with the decision to shutter four of the 28 stations. >> it is a difficult decision. we did say that we would listen to what the voters said. and they eithe
with this and not leave to the voters because the voters often get these things wrong. i don't think civil rights question shoes go to voters partly because you get into the thing of the whim of the voters and where the political whims are. we don't vote in this country on fundamental rights. freedom of speech will always be there for us. and these sort of questions like marriage and family fall within that. i mean, how would we like it if this four years people say, well, you can be married to jonathan, i can be married to rita and then the next four year, we don't like it. >> although i'm sure he would make a wonderful spouse, i don't want to -- >> hopefully we'll find out one day. >> moving right along. >> but one point i want to make here is a lot of times the court reflects kints of where we are as a society and i think what's so interesting about this time right now is we're right on the cusp. you can really see the supreme court going either way where five years ago, you know, their decision would have been obvious coming down against same-sex marriage. five years from now i think it will likely be
people and that's a high-tech in equality and that's why i've called it a civil rights issue. those people make choices, but it will have them an affect on individual child or kids would be better educated, and i think you'll have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say school choice. [applause] >> i would only add standards. it's important we as a society said very clear expectations, for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- as a member of the cabinet, secretary of state for education in the united kingdom where i got educated. so i look inward -- i look forward to hearing your questions. >> thank you very much. i just want to say, it's been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach on united. [laughter] >> the ultimate compliment. >> to hear you speak. >> the first time i've ever worried about -- [laughter] >> but you made the point that you're changing things and they also matter -- [inaudible] one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that it recognize this is a moral conflict much than anything else. and america realized tha
civil rights and they said that the senate was ending revenge for gettysburg and the rules of the senate have lent themselves -- back then, it blocked civil rights but it wasn't a work a day kind of obstructionist. as horrible as it was blocking civil rights legislation. today is it is almost everything. you need 60 votes. it doesn't even -- the majority leader can't even bring a bill up to debate without a 60 votes if the minority wants to force 60 votes. that's got to change. the selection -- the confirmation of federal judges and less than cabinet level appointees, those kinds of things are just obstructionism, period. when in the past, we always were able to just bring it forward to get 51 votes. if you don't, you don't. some of these votes will be more aimed to that. certainly to give the minority rights to slow things down but not to block things. almost haphazardly the way they do. >> bill: otherwise it is the tyranny of the minority. >> it really has become that way. so much of what the preside
in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: lawmakers stepped up the rhetoric, but grew no closer today to agreement on how to avoid slipping over the so- called fiscal cliff. but each side demanded the other compromise. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> i have to just tell you that is a... that is a bad strategy for america, it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a game that i will play. >> reporter: president obama today, in washington, assured business executives he'll reject attempts to link the fiscal cliff budget negotiations to future increases in the nation's debt ceiling. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing limit. >> if congress in any way sugg
know, howard baker was everett dirkson's son-in-law. and during the run up to the civil rights bill, howard is sitting up in dirkson's office, phone rings, dirkson picks it up, says -- and all howard can say is him saying, mr. president, i just can't come down tonight, i was there last night. i was there the night before, i just got to go home. hangs up. 20 minutes passed, and he hears beagles barking in the hallway outside his office. and lbj walks in with his dogs. so because he wouldn't come down to see him, johnson called a car, got in and came up to just force a conversation with dirkson. >> and lyndon johnson -- >> and we got a bill. >> and by the way, l lyndon johnson. he's so detached and disconnected from the hill, he would call, mark haleprin, famously, subcommittee chairman in the house. and say, hey, i hear the mark-up didn't go very well today. do you need any help? what can i do? do you need me to call anybody? how can i push this along? again, we're not heaping all the blame on the president. let me underline again. >> yeah. >> john boehner's counter offer was patheti
of civilization. it's stored right here. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. >> jennifer: injureyou're back inside "the war room." i'm jennifer granholm. we have movies that matter series. i'll tell but a movie that is causing a buzz. it's called "chasing ice"." >> i never imagined you could sees glaciers disappearing in such a short time. the initial goal was to put out 25 cameras for three years. shoot every hour as long as it was daylight to show you how the landlandscape was changing. >> the landscape is gone and it may never be seen again in the history of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was ab
a person in custody and no further details about the case were available. >> the oscar a great civil rights case was back in court yesterday lawyers for his the state john burris and dan siegel argued the ruling against johannes mehswrle and the other two board officers involved in the incident leading to grants murder should not be overturned. a federal judge ruled in may 2011 that barred cannot be held legally response for the 2009 shooting death of foster grant at oakland's fourth fail bart station. the judge wrote a $50 million federal lawsuit against the former bart police officer should be decided in a trout. >> deficit gabor supplies is expected to make its final decision on the to dry banyan on nudity. plenty of people will be on hand today as a surprise meeting. and many will oppose the ban, a plan to strip down the meeting. it would not be the first time. last month the board initially approved the ban on nude with a narrow 65 vote. several people took off their clothes and protests. if the ban is finalized, it would take effect on february 1st. i was start on that-that at one und
of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was about computer modeling, which at the time was relatively primitive. i was wrong about that. the real story was about--the real evidence had-held in the ice cores up to antarctica to to arctic. once i took time to stop and understand the empirical evosed to my my misconceptions. i started this in the late 90s but it wasn't until 2005 when the ice work started get going that i got locked into the trajectory that became the movie and ice survey. >> jennifer: you're in position to provide other i am empirical evidence, which is what your film is about. what is happening with the film? do you think it's ch
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
at that, that is a republican speaking out about civil liberties and he's absolutely right. dianne feinstein is saying hey you know what, it's time to close gitmo. what? we're talking about guilt mow again? she pointed out that the government accountability office did a study showing: >> cenk: if we can hold those terrorist prisoners in the country, why can't we bring the prisoners from guantanamo to this country? great news. there is of course bad news, bradley manning is still in prison for bringing transparency to our government. he testified for the first time. one of the things he said was: >> cenk: the solitaire confinement he had to deal with is outrageous. the defense is asking should the charges be dropped because of the inhumane conditions he's been kept in. kevin, thanks for coming back to the "young turks" to talk about this. tell me about what happened today during the hearings. >> well, it's amazing because manning sat up on the stand and i know you're familiar with his friend david house and he just sat there from the stand and talked about how he was upset that davi
a tendency to destroy their civil and their political righ rights. to be more safe they, at length, become willing to run the risk of being less free." our nation's founders warned us about the grave danger of sacrificing our most basic liberties in the pursuit of security -- security at all costs. they provided us with the constitution framed to prevent precisely such a tragic outcome. i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of the feinstein-lee amendment and against the mistaken idea that the government may detain american persons indefinitely without charge and without trial. thank you, mr. president. i yield back the rest of my time to senator feinstein. mrs. feinstein: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: mr. president, the amendment before you is cosponsored by the distinguished senator who just spoke, senator lee, senator coons, collins, paul, lautenberg, gillibrand, kirk, tester, johnson, sanders, whitehouse, heller, baucus, demint, webb, klobuchar, bingaman, rockefeller, begich, boxer, and a -- an amendment somewhat similar to this, all
: right now new violence in syria's civil war. state media there saying 29 students and a teacher were killed when a mortar slammed into a school outside damascus. and we have this. new amateur video said to be showing a government warplane on a bombing run over a damascus suburb. it is home to many rebels and their supporters. we can not confirm the authenticity of that video but we have no reasondoubt it e. conor powell live from jerusalem. >> reporter: jon, it appears the war in syria is entering a new phase. in recent days and weeks the syrian government faced a real military setback as rebels begin to advance towards damascus. that is one of the reason we've seen intense fighting around damascus and more and more of the syrian jets making bombing runs trying to attack the syrian opposition groups. the fear if the syrian government, the assad regime feels their grip is beginning to loosen and slip away that they will turn to chemical weapons. there is evidence according to u.s. around national intelligence officials say that the assad regime is beginning to prepare their chemical a
a vote walked right out of the hall. activists say the measure could limit civil lishedz in a big way. among other things increases the influence of sharia law and commits the state to protecting morlgs and the quote traditional family. the document does strengthen bans on torture and arbitrary arrests. also curbs executive power and pliments presidential terms. this comes just after the president there mohammed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers basically made himself a dictator. that's what first triggered the protests and less than two years after the fall of egypt's aauthoritarian leader hosni mom bark many egyptians fear their new leader and islamist allies are putting the country back on the path toward dictatorship. steve harrigan live in cairo. steve, any sign the president is willing to concede on any of this? shepard, president morsey has made no moves on compromise. one thing we have seen from supporters in the muslim brotherhood the care shown in trying to avoid any conflict or violence in the square here. that's certainly going to be put to the test tomorrow. that'
of civil courts, they stand a much better chance of keeping their jobs. >> we would vigorously defend our members' right to engage in legal off duty conduct. the duty would be on the employer to show there is impact on the job. >> with no clear test for impairment, shep, the whole thing is in a bit of a purple haze, back to you. >> shepard: listen to you, big dan. thank you, sir. on any given night in new york city thousands of people are living on the streets. even in the dead of winter most people just walk right by them. that may be why one new york city's officer good deed getting so much attention. a tourist snapped this photo of him in times square giving boots to a bare foot homeless guy. we're told the officer bought them with his own money. >> he had boots in his hand and i heard him quite clearly say i have these size 12 all-weather boots for you let's take care of you. the gentleman sat down against the wall and i'm telling you his face lit up. >> shepard: that officer tells the "new york times" newspaper it was freezing out and he could see the blisters on the man's feet. the
about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medicare, and doing some cuts there under this plan. but compare it to the white house plan, very different
responsible for paying civil penalties. bill: late last night if you missed this, the senate voted to keep the terror suspects at gitmo right where they are. they will not come here if the senate has its way. the measure will block the transfer of detainees to u.s. soil. a day of at report identified facilities in the u.s. believed to be capable housing them. senators approved the measure, 54-41. general yak keen, jack keane, is flies to see you again. melissa: good morning, bill. bill: does this mean gitmo does not close not even in a second term or does the president come and veto this? melissa: there i think will be pressure to try to close it which doesn't make a lot of sense to me. we have enemy combatants in there as a result of a war. the frustration is the war has gone on for a long time and therefore we should do something about these detainees. we're not making the choice for the war going on a long time. the al qaeda and affiliates are making that choice. they just burned down our consulate and killed our ambassador and forced close sure of a cia base. they're protracking the wa
of the house? >> all right. >> all right. you guys are -- were you okay in the green room? nobody separated you two, did they? it was a civil? >> no, we get along. >> in the green room -- >> any bagels in there for you guys? >> no, we don't eat bagels. >> guys on monday got bagels. >> the bagels were there? >> it's all good. >> i judge what we think -- >> i'm jewish, when i walk into a room, i immediately know if there are bagels. >> did you get a tree? >> a holiday tree? >> yeah. >> you do? >> my wife says no, they're too messy. >> the christmas tree is the celebration of saturn, anybody could have a christmas tree. >> did you get a festivus pole? >> now you're talking. >> this is a family show. >> it's early. >> thank you very much, dan. we appreciate it. chris is sticking around. up next, we are half way through the holiday shopping season. we're going to look at the winners and losers after this. >>> and 7:40 eastern time, steven ross, looking to revitalize a major area of new york. we're going to talk business and football when he joins us in a few minutes. drum and flute" can look who's b
other top stories in "the situation room" right now. what's the latest? >> cleared for the crash of a concord jet 12 years ago. while the criminal charges were unjustified, the airline still must pay civil penalties of more than $1 million. the court agreed that the concord ran over a strip of metal that had fallen off of a continental plane causing it to blow a tire as it took off from the airport. 113 people died in that crash. and black friday sales may have been a little too good for toys r us. after offering incentive after incentive to shop early, well, it seems the company hasn't been able to keep up with demand. its facebook page has plenty of people now complaining. many of them placed orders online only to find out that the company later canceled those purchases because it didn't have enough in stock. and the original bat mobile, yes, it could be yours for at least a few hundred thousand dollars. the bat mobile used in the 1960s batman tv series, it is expected to go on the auction block in january. it was customized from a 1955 lincoln concept car. on tv the car could
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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